Lost In Translation

Nobody really knows what Bill Murray’s character whispers to Scarlet…

At the end of the movie it is left up to the viewer to determine whether it is a beginning or an end, and I have always felt that the story up to that point was only a prequel to the real story.

This is how Beijing feels to me today. It is only a beginning; an introduction to my Trans Siberian adventure; an invitation to return.

Calligraphy at dawn
Calligraphy at dawn

But what rich and rewarding stories unfolded in this super city.

Beijing parks bustle from dawn and the city awakens. Elderly folk silently practice tai chi, artists inscribe wet marks of calligraphy onto slate pavements while tiny children are indulged by doting grandparents.

Our tourist group gathered in Tiananmen Square where the symbolism of past events are truly overwhelming when put into context by the size of this famous landmark. Chairman Mao’s portrait is proudly displayed at the western end and I feel watched over with all the other passers by. This is the low season for westerners but it is still busier than most places I’ve known back home.

Inside the Forbidden City
Inside the Forbidden City

We are herded in lines into the Forbidden City where once again I’m saturated with a sense of history that I find difficult to fathom. The cobblestones courtyards are surrounded by red painted, veranda edged buildings topped with brightly, glazed roof tiles. Tourists huddle at cordoned off doorways of temples to grab a peek inside at a past life and I am reminded of the manipulations of court life and the excesses of the guilded cage that many of the concubines lived in far from their families and watched over by the ultimate public servant.. the eunuch.

Outside, we cross a moat and head back into the bustling modern life that is Beijing. We stop for dumplings in a back street before getting our caffeine fix at Starbucks. Later that night we visit the guide’s friend Alice for dinner in her tea house in a nearby hutong. Of course we can’t resist looking back to our own ancient 70’s heritage and name it ‘Alice’s Restaurant’. After dinner we are introduced to a diverse range and very distinctive flavours of tea.

We walked from Gate 18 to 6 on this section of the Great Wall
We walked from Gate 18 to 6 on this section of the Great Wall

The following day we visited The Great Wall at Mutianyu. What can I say? It is a brilliantly engineered, original idea of a 10000 kms long barrier to keep out the marauding Mongels. I understand the pain suffered building it and that can never be negated but I must admit that this architectural masterpiece is now my number one, número uno, favourite, most amazing, man made wonder of the world. I have never seen anything quite so spectacular in all my life! Pictures and words just can’t do it justice. You must go and see it.. and take the time to walk as many gates as possible.

What a wonderful country! What a delightful city!

Beijing has a population of 22 million and yet the streets are spotless and I found all the people I interacted with to be interested, intelligent, warm and inviting. Their English is far better than my Chinese will ever be and while there were some very funny, literal translations

Walking home after dinner in a nearby hutong.
Walking home after dinner in a nearby hutong.

on products, there was definitely nothing lost in translation of the smiles that greeted us.

I feel I’ve only just scratched the surface of this amazing place and I look forward to coming back one day in springtime or autumn to see the colours of nature as a backdrop to the swirling, kaleidoscope of bright colours that are the people of this fascinating country.

The next day we boarded the train early and our journey continued toward our next adventure… Mongolia!